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Posted July 14, 2017

New Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN) Site Now Available!

georgia historical newspaper project

GALILEO is pleased to announce that the Digital Library of Georgia has launched the new Georgia Historic Newspapers website.

The site is available here: http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/

The GALILEO Express Link is: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=ghna

The site offers an improved interface and greater search capability.

It is compatible with all current browsers, and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins (no more DjVu plugin!) or additional software downloads. All previously digitized newspapers are scheduled to be incorporated into the new GHN platform. Until that time, users may continue to access the existing regional and city sites (North, South, West Georgia, Athens, Macon, Milledgeville, and Savannah) via GALILEO.

The Milledgeville and the South Georgia historic newspapers are slated to be integrated into GHN next. The full press release from the Digital Library of Georgia is included below.

====PRESS RELEASE====

WRITER: Mandy Mastrovita, mastrovi@uga.edu, 706-583-0209
CONTACT: Sheila McAlister, mcalists@uga.edu, 706-542-5418

New website devoted to Georgia historic newspapers available from the Digital Library of Georgia.

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce the launch of a brand-new website featuring historic newspaper titles from around the state. Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), available at http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/

Since 2007, the Digital Library of Georgia has been providing access to the state’s historic newspapers through multiple, online city and regional newspaper archives. The DLG’s newest website, Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), continues that tradition by bringing together new and existing resources into a single, consolidated website.“Historic newspapers provide a unique look at our state over time. They are invaluable to scholars and the general public alike as they provide in-depth coverage of Georgia counties and cities, report on the activities of state and local government, and reflect the social and cultural values of the time that they were created. By far, they are DLG’s most popular resources,” remarked Sheila McAlister, director of the Digital Library of Georgia. “We’re grateful for the assistance of our partners as we continue to add new content and improve how our users interact with these important historic documents.”

The GHN includes some of the state’s earliest newspapers; important African-American, Roman Catholic, and Cherokee newspapers; and issues from Augusta, Atlanta, Columbus, Fayetteville, Houston county, Louisville, Thomson, Sandersville, Waycross, and Waynesboro. The latest additions bring the total number of newspaper pages available free online through the DLG to 825,000 pages. Like the older DLG newspaper sites, GHN provides newspaper issues that are full-text searchable and can be browsed by date and title. Features of the new site include:

The site is compatible with all current browsers, and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. All previously digitized newspapers are scheduled to be incorporated into the new GHN platform. Until that time, users may continue to access the existing regional and city sites (North, South, West Georgia, Athens, Macon, Milledgeville, and Savannah). Milledgeville and the South Georgia historic newspapers are slated to be integrated into GHN next. Digitization of the newspapers found in the initial launch of GHN was made possible through partnerships with the following organizations:

About the Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive
The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), a part of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia Libraries. Since 2007, the DLG has partnered with universities, archives, public libraries, historical societies, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions to digitize historical newspapers from around the state. The archive is free and open for public use.

Posted July 5, 2017

Resources on the 2017 Solar Eclipse

eclipse image

Many libraries in Georgia are promoting the solar eclipse on August 21st. The northeast corner of the state is in the total eclipse path, but the rest of the state will experience a partial eclipse at 90%. StarNet’s Eclipse Resource Center features a free 2017 Solar Eclipse Guide, educational videos, and promotional examples from other libraries offering programs and materials.

GALILEO users have access to Sky & Telescope, Astronomy, and scholarly astronomy and astrophysics journals. Find specific titles by clicking on the Magazines A-Z or Journals A-Z tab. Alternatively, you can use the GALILEO Discover search for eclipse articles, limiting to specific astronomy titles, if you like. Searching for eclipse in Explora and MasterFILE returns a compact, relevant set of results for leisure reading. Britannica School includes articles, images, and videos of eclipses and other K-12-focused astronomy topics.

Don’t forget to check e-book collections for astronomy, as well as any other subject on earth. Or beyond.
eBook Academic Collection (EBSCO)
eBook High School Collection (EBSCO)
eBook K-8 Collection (EBSCO)
eBook Public Library Collection (EBSCO)
Ebook Central (ProQuest)

Keep your fingers crossed for clear skies, but just in case, NASA will feature live coverage and video streams. The NASA.gov eclipse website also features an eclipse party kit, downloadable materials, an event directory, and lots of trustworthy information.

Posted May 25, 2017

Registration Open for GALILEO Annual Conference

Conference logo

GALILEO and Georgia Public Library Service (GPLS) are pleased to present the second GALILEO Annual Conference on Friday, June 16th. This one-day event is an opportunity for all of Georgia’s library community to learn more about GALILEO, touch base with content providers, and network with colleagues across the state. The conference will take place at the Middle Georgia State University, Macon campus. Seats are capped at 250, so register soon.

This year’s theme, Moving Forward Together, will lay out the groundwork for GALILEO’s future. GALILEO has spent the last year working with and listening to stakeholders and representatives from libraries in Georgia to develop a new strategic plan that will take GALILEO into the next 10-15 years. In addition to all the learning opportunities, you’ll have a chance to share your thoughts on the new vision and direction for GALILEO at this conference.

Session topics have been planned to meet the interests of the different kinds of libraries participating in GALILEO, including academic, K-12, and public. This conference is free and lunch is included.

GALILEO Annual Conference website

Posted May 24, 2017

Happy Birthday, Henry Grady!

Henry Grady

On this day in 1850, Henry W. Grady was born in Athens, Georgia. Grady was the managing editor of the Atlanta Constitution in the 1880s and a proponent of the New South. He published an article titled “The New South” in the Atlanta Daily Herald on March 14, 1874. Grady’s New South advocated unity between the South and North and promoted the advancement of industry in Atlanta. Grady’s campaigning worked and partnerships with the North increased investment in Atlanta industry. One example is the cotton expositions Atlanta hosted in 1881, 1887, and 1895. These events brought in millions of investment dollars to Atlanta. Grady also lobbied to establish the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta after proclaiming the superiority of Atlanta over other smaller cities in Georgia. As you can imagine, these claims did not make the other cities happy. While Grady’s New South was not universally accepted, Grady attempted to attach northern interests to Atlanta until his abrupt death from pneumonia on December 23, 1889.

We are still reminded of Henry Grady in our everyday lives. The Georgia county of Grady was named after him in 1905, as is Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta which opened on June 1, 1892.

Read the original article “The New South” in the Atlanta Daily Herald in the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive from the Digital Library of Georgia.

Images are from the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Posted May 15, 2017

Top 50 GALILEO Searches for April 2017

top searches for april 2017

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