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Posted August 30, 2017

Top 50 GALILEO Searches for July 2017

top searches july 2017

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Posted August 29, 2017

Consumer Reports Widget Now Available!

consumer reports

Finding trustworthy product reviews in Consumer Reports is now easy and intuitive with the new widget that will help patrons search this core journal straight from your library’s website. Patrons can either search the last two years of issues or all available issues.

The CR search box FAQ will walk you through downloading the widget code and setting it up to work with your individual library.

Note: You will need to contact GALILEO Support using our Contact Us Form to obtain your library’s unique information for inserting into the widget code. The widget will not work without this information.

If you have any questions, please submit a comment using our contact us form.

Posted August 28, 2017

54th Anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have a Dream” Speech

i have a dream

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C. On the 54th anniversary of this event, you can read the full text of the “I Have a Dream” speech in MAS Ultra in GALILEO.

Images from the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Some links may not work off site. Log in to GALILEO first for access

Posted July 14, 2017

New Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN) Site Now Available!

georgia historical newspaper project

GALILEO is pleased to announce that the Digital Library of Georgia has launched the new Georgia Historic Newspapers website.

The site is available here: http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/

The GALILEO Express Link is: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/express?link=ghna

The site offers an improved interface and greater search capability.

It is compatible with all current browsers, and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins (no more DjVu plugin!) or additional software downloads. All previously digitized newspapers are scheduled to be incorporated into the new GHN platform. Until that time, users may continue to access the existing regional and city sites (North, South, West Georgia, Athens, Macon, Milledgeville, and Savannah) via GALILEO.

The Milledgeville and the South Georgia historic newspapers are slated to be integrated into GHN next. The full press release from the Digital Library of Georgia is included below.

====PRESS RELEASE====

WRITER: Mandy Mastrovita, mastrovi@uga.edu, 706-583-0209
CONTACT: Sheila McAlister, mcalists@uga.edu, 706-542-5418

New website devoted to Georgia historic newspapers available from the Digital Library of Georgia.

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce the launch of a brand-new website featuring historic newspaper titles from around the state. Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), available at http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/

Since 2007, the Digital Library of Georgia has been providing access to the state’s historic newspapers through multiple, online city and regional newspaper archives. The DLG’s newest website, Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), continues that tradition by bringing together new and existing resources into a single, consolidated website.“Historic newspapers provide a unique look at our state over time. They are invaluable to scholars and the general public alike as they provide in-depth coverage of Georgia counties and cities, report on the activities of state and local government, and reflect the social and cultural values of the time that they were created. By far, they are DLG’s most popular resources,” remarked Sheila McAlister, director of the Digital Library of Georgia. “We’re grateful for the assistance of our partners as we continue to add new content and improve how our users interact with these important historic documents.”

The GHN includes some of the state’s earliest newspapers; important African-American, Roman Catholic, and Cherokee newspapers; and issues from Augusta, Atlanta, Columbus, Fayetteville, Houston county, Louisville, Thomson, Sandersville, Waycross, and Waynesboro. The latest additions bring the total number of newspaper pages available free online through the DLG to 825,000 pages. Like the older DLG newspaper sites, GHN provides newspaper issues that are full-text searchable and can be browsed by date and title. Features of the new site include:

The site is compatible with all current browsers, and the newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. All previously digitized newspapers are scheduled to be incorporated into the new GHN platform. Until that time, users may continue to access the existing regional and city sites (North, South, West Georgia, Athens, Macon, Milledgeville, and Savannah). Milledgeville and the South Georgia historic newspapers are slated to be integrated into GHN next. Digitization of the newspapers found in the initial launch of GHN was made possible through partnerships with the following organizations:

About the Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive
The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), a part of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia Libraries. Since 2007, the DLG has partnered with universities, archives, public libraries, historical societies, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions to digitize historical newspapers from around the state. The archive is free and open for public use.

Posted May 24, 2017

Happy Birthday, Henry Grady!

Henry Grady

On this day in 1850, Henry W. Grady was born in Athens, Georgia. Grady was the managing editor of the Atlanta Constitution in the 1880s and a proponent of the New South. He published an article titled “The New South” in the Atlanta Daily Herald on March 14, 1874. Grady’s New South advocated unity between the South and North and promoted the advancement of industry in Atlanta. Grady’s campaigning worked and partnerships with the North increased investment in Atlanta industry. One example is the cotton expositions Atlanta hosted in 1881, 1887, and 1895. These events brought in millions of investment dollars to Atlanta. Grady also lobbied to establish the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta after proclaiming the superiority of Atlanta over other smaller cities in Georgia. As you can imagine, these claims did not make the other cities happy. While Grady’s New South was not universally accepted, Grady attempted to attach northern interests to Atlanta until his abrupt death from pneumonia on December 23, 1889.

We are still reminded of Henry Grady in our everyday lives. The Georgia county of Grady was named after him in 1905, as is Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta which opened on June 1, 1892.

Read the original article “The New South” in the Atlanta Daily Herald in the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive from the Digital Library of Georgia.

Images are from the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

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